EmailUniverse.com   Email Newsletter Publishing Strategies  
Search In Epub
 
   
   

   
  Ezine-Tips
  List-News


 

EPUB Archives

[Thread Prev][Thread Next][Thread]

[epub] Re: Using 3rd Party Program vs hosting your own Enewsletter
  • To: Epub Discussion Group <epub@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Subject: [epub] Re: Using 3rd Party Program vs hosting your own Enewsletter
  • From: "Paul Myers" <paul@xxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2005 15:18:08 -0600
  • Priority: normal

> The person who is stepping down as their web person has
> said that it is not a good idea for the org to host its own
> because all it takes is for one person to complain about
> spam (even though they will have an opt in subscriber list),
> for the whole site to potentially be shut down.

Depends on how stable your web host is, and how smart their 
abuse department is. It can happen.

For an organization of any size that doesn't have the internal 
tech savvy and a sane web host (and you never know about that 
last one), it's probably smart to use a third party host for 
mailings.

The challenge is that, if your web host isn't sane, you can 
get shut down for spam complaints no matter who's sending the 
email. If it's about your site and someone complains, you can 
still get axed.

My recommendations:

1. If you don't have the internal tech to handle a confirmed
   email list, outsource it.

2. Know your web host. Read the Terms of Service and
   Acceptable Use Policy. If you see the words "zero
   tolerance," or you see anything that makes it look like
   they have an itchy trigger finger, move. You should also
   move if they don't forbid spamming and allow for shutting
   a site down for spam. Both are bad signs.

3. Keep very regular backups of your site, including scripts,
   databases, and lists of email addresses (yours). Know what
   technology is needed to run the site, and have three backup
   providers to go to in case of problems. Just a list of
   places, not actual accounts.

4. Have a complete operational backup on an inexpensive host
   somewhere, so you can get at least basic functionality
   restored fast, while you get set up on a more complete
   basis somewhere else in case of problems.

Yes, this sounds like the way spammers work. It isn't. With 
the damage being done to legitimate companies over these 
issues, it's just good sense.

If your web presence isn't that crucial, you may not need to 
do all of these. Or even any of them, depending. But they're 
options to keep in mind.


Paul

[Thread Prev][Thread Next][Thread]

Thread Index